Building waste, reuse and recycling

Now we’ve finished all the basics, we’re back from being away, the snow has gone and the rain has finally stopped, it’s time to think about clearing the site, landscaping and planting. The immediate thing that strikes you is just how much ‘stuff’ there is that’s left over when you build a house. And this is even given all the steps we’ve taken to reduce waste, particularly with the insulation where the Chris and his crew were superb at making use of almost every piece of off-cut wood fibre. And yet… ‘Ecological’ products come wrapped in layers of plastic. Roofers leave inexplicably large pieces of off-cut steel lying around. Siding comes in job lots that always seem to require one more pallet than you thought you would need. And so on. It would be really nice if you could plan the entire house to be precise about the amounts of materials you would need and would fit with commercially-available quantities, but that’s just not feasible.

So after the trials and tribulations of building, the challenges, the fun and the romance, there seems to be a of ‘waste’ to deal with. And there will be more once we start demolishing the old house. Anything that’s unused or reusable, we’re going to store in the barn. Material that could be of use in maintaining the new house (like any uninstalled siding, decking planks etc.), we’ll keep. We also have some plans for greenhouses and chicken coops, and so there’s plenty of stuff we can use for those projects. Other material, we will offer to anyone who thinks they can make use of it. Some, we can recycle, but unfortunately there will be some sent to landfill – as little as we can, but it seems very difficult to do an entirely ‘zero waste’ build within the current system.

But first of all, it all this stuff to be sorted out. So that’s what I’ll be doing over the coming week!

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3 thoughts on “Building waste, reuse and recycling

  1. David Post author

    Well, our neighbours, Denis and Martine, are building a new deck so we were happy to pass on the remaining deck blocks and treated lumber to them!

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    1. David Post author

      In theory, you have to get a fire permit, which is only $5 or something. But most people on the island apprently don’t bother. There are controls on when burning can take place, especially when it gets very dry. This is not a problem right now! So we may well be burning some stuff particularly dried brushwood and maybe the old deck timbers – but they are full of screws and are also treated with preservatives so we’d have to do it carefully and subject to advice.

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